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Anti-Privacy Lobbying by Tech Giants

News broke out this week about Facebook lobbying governments to water down privacy laws.

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/mar/02/facebook-global-lobbying-campaign-against-data-privacy-laws-investment

Facebook is not the only one. I posted an article from the BBC how other tech giants are heavily lobbying the British government to water down impending regulations.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-47400140

Are you surprised that the tech giants and social media platforms are heavily lobbying governments? Personal data is their business and the business has been good so far with self-regulation. Self-regulation has not worked and will not work. You cannot have the fox securing the chicken coop. They are way too clever and have mountains of resource to protect their business, hide their tracks and just as many inventive ways to be just one step ahead of the regulators. Not a single week passes that we hear about more (dis)ingenious ways we are being tracked, our privacy being violated that we had previously not been aware of. From, ultrasonic signals to off-site tracking to apps selling personal data.

Luckily for us, we have many champions of privacy fighting our corner and people are increasingly becoming aware of the impact of the loss of their privacy. Thanks mainly due to the #GDPR, which has launched thousands of privacy ships around the world. From India to Jordan, to California there are up to 130 countries looking at privacy legislation. This will impact their business. This is great news but due to the rate of technological advance legislations are almost obsolete even before they are ratified.

As with other regulated industries, when the regulations become tough the companies move to countries where the regulations do not exist, are light touch or their lobbying is more effective. The tobacco industry comes to mind. When regulation became tough in the West, they move their operations to the new and less regulated countries. Will the Surveillance Capital companies to the same? Move to lesser or non-regulated countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America and in the Middle East? Not will these countries are likely to have weaker privacy laws some will be more conducive to effective lobbying too.